Its always the same. Whenever you have visitors you make the effort to do things. To go places. Since we gave had the house in Spain we have done a lot. A lot of the same. I’m not complaining when the same is the Alhambra but sometimes is good to be encouraged to don something different. So with a new visitor in tow who is interested in all things garden we went to The Botanical Gardens Malaga .

I have been driving past the gardens for nearly a year – it can be seen from the motorway on our way to the house from the airport. Not that I have looked before – I’m always driving and my eyes are on the road ahead behind and sideways – why? Because I am driving on the wrong side of the road and it needs concentration.

The gardens are pretty central and were quiet – tickets inexpensive and a good cafe just as you go in. You just have to start with a coffee and a cake don’t you? I need sustenance for the walking.

Armed with a map of the gardens we were off along the date palm walk up to the cactus and succulents.

To be honest first impressions weren’t one if wonder. Yes. The date palms were impressive. There was a lake. A walk up to the cactus and succulents. It was ok- the three of us agreed on that. The cactus individually were interesting and there were some pretty fine specimens. But it felt unloved. It didn’t have the feel or look of Kew. Great individual photo opportunities and great viewed from the paths looking down.

Theres a great variety of cactus – great to see a few that we have in the garden!

The walk from this area moved you through huge and by huge i mean huge trees, palms bamboos. Both tropical and sub tropical. An area of native plants. A historical garden. I wish I’d read the Malaga tourist board information before and not after I visited as it gives an interesting history of the garden and its walks. Still. Im going back in April and will do my homework first.

I’ve seen a review which bemoans the fact that the paths are uneven. I think it adds to the experience. One of our comments as we walked through was that the palms and succulents hadn’t been cleared of the dead leaves in what looked like decades. But. In their natural habitats they wouldn’t have would they! I guess we are so used to seeing manicured gardens where everything is tended for viewing by paying visitors. Stripped of any sign of dead wood. . Dead leaves. Spent flowers. theres weren’t.

But hey. What trees. What palms. The biggest Strelitzia I have ever seen. And it was the blue and white flowering one. Not that it was flowering now. Nor could you really get a picture! So you will just have to believe me.

The trunks of the trees were impressive. My mother once said to me ‘ you have legs like tree trunks’. Not like these mother! Massive. Gnarled. Creeping and in parts creepy. I wouldn’t want to be locked in here at night!

There was bamboo. Ive never seen such huge bamboo. invasive. Tall. Yet impressive. There was a huge area of black bamboo – the bamboo wood which covers over 1.000 sqm. Really thick really tall. The bamboo areas are over 150 years old. You’d never run out of bamboo canes would you!!

This Swiss Cheese plant – Monstera Deliciosa was indeed a Monstera. A huge Monstera. We have one our garden. Its a mini one in comparison. Look at the staking this one has been. There were loads if them. Literally loads. Makes tje one that sat in my parents house with the obligatory rubber plant , look like a bonsai.

That and agapanthus. Not yet in flower. I’dlike to see the agapanthus when in full bloom . I’m a huge fan of them. As Arnie said ‘I’ll be back. ‘

I was surprised to see some gorgeous clivia. I don’t know why I was surprised. But I was. Now clivia is one of my favourites. When we first had the cottage in Somerset – 20 odd years ago a neighbour , a horticulturist and ex Blue Peter gardener had a shop in the next town. She introduced me to unusual plants. Cornish daffodils and clivia. So these always make me think of her. In the UK I had them as a houseplant. But I’ve recently bought some for a shaded part of our garden in Spain. So it was interesting to see swathes of them underplanted in beds beneath the canopy above. Shade lovers. So I have planted right back at home. phew.

The leaves are similar to agapanthus but a bit fatter and firmer.

What I haven’t seen before is such glorious seed heads. Lets see if mine get them.

I’ve seen some reviews bemoaning the fact that there are no flowers in the Botanical gardens. Well there are. Maybe not the flower beds you see at the Alhambra – which are being planted now with annuals. But this is a different garden. Oh. And there are flowers. A walk through the Hibiscus walk is colourful. Even when not in full bloom. .

We have one hibiscus – in a pot in out garden. Colour unknown. But I would happily take any of these. ( i didn’t.)

I love finding plants I’ve never seen before and this one – Justicab Aurea Schitd ( spell checked the last bit. Me and fat fingers an all that!)!! Brazilian Plume is a beauty.

There is a big wisteria arch which at this tome of year wasn’t in flower. But all along the sides of the arch on the floor was pot after pot after pot. Of aspidistra.

Despite my initial reaction I have to say I loved it. Not manicured to death. Trees and palms untouched – looking more like they would in their natural environment.

I will be back. In April!

4 thoughts on “Botanical Gardens Malaga

  1. Well done on resisting going for a year! Looks very interesting, I imagine it really will be even better in April. I love visiting botanical gardens in other countries as they’re so different, often more open to the elements.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I know. Too busy going to the Alhambra. Was there last week and there again on Sunday. Georgie from Common farm here for the weekend. We have a road trip in march to toledo cordoba salamanca and Casares. Starting to look at gardens to visit!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Hi, Andrew. Your posts always evoke memories of things I’ve done, places I’ve been. Clever! This one reminds me of a visit to a (very unloved) Gibraltar Botanical Gardens about 15 years ago when I “liberated” some tiny plantlets of Agave Attenuata from a far forgotten corner, brought them home wrapped in tissue in my handbag, and then managed to keep going for a few years (in an unheated greenhouse over winter …). It also reminds me of a visit to a silent, deserted Entebbe Botanical Gardens when we visited my daughter in Uganda while she was working in DRCongo. We were the only three people there (apart from our driver and two young men doing research at the associated university buildings -so they said- who acted as self-appointed guides). The latter was a truly magical morning topped off by lunch beside Lake Victoria (extremely chewy goat and bony fish!). I enjoyed your visit to Malaga!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I love clivias too – they grew as weeds in a garden I had in Australia. They were compensation for not being able to grow daffodils. I love the hibiscus too.

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